trilliumgrl: Me, putting on make-up before the wedding (Default)
I was watching a bit of the Olympics and the TiVo just switched itself over to Fox. Terminator: the Sarah Connor Chronicles is back! This is an unexpected surprise.
trilliumgrl: (Kyna Doll)
Wow, I've been a little remiss. This post will be lengthy and I still suspect I missed a few items. They are in no particular order and I reserve the right to be vague, since it may have been awhile since i read the book.

The Wild Wood (Brian Froud's Faerielands) by Charles de Lint. I found this hiding on mom's bookcase. The concept for this series is interesting. Brian Froud did a bunch of art, set it down in front of a bunch of authors and had them pick out what drew them and write stories about them. While this is probably not his best work, it is interesting and made me want to finish it. If you like de Lint, it will be familiar territory. The art is standard Froud, but this is not a bad thing. I am tempted to search out the other pieces of the series. Amazon lists at least one other, written by Patricia McKillip.

Interworld by Neil Gaiman and Michael Reeves. This was good. Written as a YA, but enough meat to keep an older reader interested, including my favorite - not explaining every little bloody thing right away (or even at all). Recommended.

Little Brother by Cory Doctorow. Go read this NOW! Ignore the fact that it is in the YA section. This book is incredible. The tech is viable (per Sean), the plot is gripping, the lead character is believable. Go read this and have everyone you know read this, particularly those for whom the YA section is intended.

A Night in the Lonesome October by Roger Zelazny with illustrator Gahan Wilson. Described by one review as "Victorian light supernatural fantasy", this is a good fun read, full of familiar characters such as Jack the Ripper, and Dracula to tell a tall about a night the elder gods might return - all from the perspective of a dog. I love Zelazny and this is a nice fun example of him at his best.

Lost in a Good Book and The Well of Lost Plots by Jasper Fforde. I had the 3rd one of this series sitting around forever , until I got my hands on number 2. Now I must hunt down the next book. These are genuinely clever and funny fantasy mysteries. I was slow to get on the band wagon (so many books, so little time), but I recommend these even if you are not a sci-fi reader they stand along as good mysteries in a world not quite our own.

Blood Noir by Laurell K. Hamilton. The smut starts within the first two chapters, but still, this is better than it's been. There is a mystery and plot beyond sex here and lots of Jason, who is a vast improvement over Richard. Candy for my brain.

Nightwatch by Sergei Lukyanenko. Yes, the Russian vampire book upon which the movie is based. It reads almost as three separate linked novellas, with themes and situations repeating, which is less tiresome than it sounds. The main character is a bit of a dork, and the world on top of ours that has been created is very interesting. I am looking forward to reading the next book in the series.

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld. This is another good reason to go digging in the YA section. Original, interesting, with well-done characters and a gripping plot. This is the first in a series, and he has me hooked. Would probably work for kids even younger than could handle Little Brother. A well-written sci-fi book that happens to be appropriate for the younger set. Go read this.

Urban Shaman by C.E. Murphy. I enjoyed this both as urban fantasy and as a mystery. appropriate use of the gods and the fey, as well as a good bit of humor. Looking forward to reading more.

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trilliumgrl: Me, putting on make-up before the wedding (Default)
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